Engineering is Awesome
The Hövding is Your Fashion Forward, Invisible Skull Protector
When cycling, you typically don’t want invisibility to be any part of your ride. However, if you have a high sense of fashion and enjoy the wind flowing through your stylish locks, you will be glad to know there’s an alternative to the traditional bicycle helmet. The Hövding is the design thesis, brought-to-life brain-child of Anna Haupt and Terese Alstin. It’s a collar worn round the neck, fit with motion sensors, microcontrollers and a unique way of wrapping your gourd in the event of an accident.
The Hövding is a zipped collar constructed of black, waterproof and dirt-resistant fabric. It comes with Shell options to coordinate your outfit or preferred crash situation. When smashing into a wall, being hit by a car or other unexpected trauma-inducing accident, the device’s motion sensors pick up the cyclist’s complex, unexpected movements, sending a signal to a airbag. This hidden head sack deploys from the collar, inflating in a tenth of a second to envelope the head and neck of the cyclist.


SolidSmack.com

The Hövding is Your Fashion Forward, Invisible Skull Protector

When cycling, you typically don’t want invisibility to be any part of your ride. However, if you have a high sense of fashion and enjoy the wind flowing through your stylish locks, you will be glad to know there’s an alternative to the traditional bicycle helmet. The Hövding is the design thesis, brought-to-life brain-child of Anna Haupt and Terese Alstin. It’s a collar worn round the neck, fit with motion sensors, microcontrollers and a unique way of wrapping your gourd in the event of an accident.

The Hövding is a zipped collar constructed of black, waterproof and dirt-resistant fabric. It comes with Shell options to coordinate your outfit or preferred crash situation. When smashing into a wall, being hit by a car or other unexpected trauma-inducing accident, the device’s motion sensors pick up the cyclist’s complex, unexpected movements, sending a signal to a airbag. This hidden head sack deploys from the collar, inflating in a tenth of a second to envelope the head and neck of the cyclist.

SolidSmack.com

Recycled Cardboard Bicycle F $9

Izhar Gafni, originally from Kibbutz Bror Hayil in the Negev, took the most popular and widely sold vehicle in the community and decided to turn it into an entirely green private venture.

Gafni’s bicycle redefines the idea of green transportation in every way, being environmentally friendly from early stages of production all the way through creation of the final product. The bicycles are made out of recycled and used cardboard.

The primary use, like any bicycle, is to prevent pollution while encouraging physical activity and exercise. In an interview with Newsgeek, Gafni said that the production cost for his recycled bicycles is around $9-12 each, and he estimates it could be sold to a consumer for $60 to 90, depending on what parts they choose to add.

Made In Israel: Environment News

smarterplanet:

Flywheel Hybrid Bicycle Brings F1 Tech to the Bike Lane | Gas 2.0
The bike you see here has been rigged up with a 15 lb. automotive  flywheel that’s mated to a CVT, which allows the rear wheel to transfer  kinetic energy to the flywheel under “braking”, effectively slowing the  bike down.  Once the cyclist is ready to pick up speed again, the CVT is  shifted the other way, and the spinning mass of the flywheel “boosts”  the rider’s legs and provides forward motion – just like the flywheel  KERS systems proposed by Williams F1 (which provides flywheel hybrid  tech to Porsche) and Volvo.
The  bike you see here has been rigged up with a 15 lb. automotive flywheel  that’s mated to a CVT, which allows the rear wheel to transfer kinetic  energy to the flywheel under “braking”, effectively slowing the bike  down.  Once the cyclist is ready to pick up speed again, the CVT is  shifted the other way, and the spinning mass of the flywheel “boosts”  the rider’s legs and provides forward motion – just like the flywheel KERS systems proposed by Williams F1 (which provides flywheel hybrid tech to Porsche) and Volvo.
Source: Gas 2.0 (http://s.tt/133pI)

smarterplanet:

Flywheel Hybrid Bicycle Brings F1 Tech to the Bike Lane | Gas 2.0

The bike you see here has been rigged up with a 15 lb. automotive flywheel that’s mated to a CVT, which allows the rear wheel to transfer kinetic energy to the flywheel under “braking”, effectively slowing the bike down. Once the cyclist is ready to pick up speed again, the CVT is shifted the other way, and the spinning mass of the flywheel “boosts” the rider’s legs and provides forward motion – just like the flywheel KERS systems proposed by Williams F1 (which provides flywheel hybrid tech to Porsche) and Volvo.

The bike you see here has been rigged up with a 15 lb. automotive flywheel that’s mated to a CVT, which allows the rear wheel to transfer kinetic energy to the flywheel under “braking”, effectively slowing the bike down.  Once the cyclist is ready to pick up speed again, the CVT is shifted the other way, and the spinning mass of the flywheel “boosts” the rider’s legs and provides forward motion – just like the flywheel KERS systems proposed by Williams F1 (which provides flywheel hybrid tech to Porsche) and Volvo.

Source: Gas 2.0 (http://s.tt/133pI)