Engineering is Awesome

Minnesotan contractor Andrey Rudenko is now the king of his castle; his 3D-printed concrete castle, that is. After completing a journey that took more than two years, Rudenko developed a customized 3D printer to extrude concrete and build a castle that he had designed himself. The entire structure is approximately 3 meters by 5 meters, which really makes it an amazing backyard fort rather than an actual livable structure.

Extruding concrete to create 3D-printed buildings isn’t entirely novel. It has been proposed to quickly create inexpensive housing in poverty-stricken areas and even to build infrastructure on Mars before the arrival of astronauts. However, those buildings were designed to be fairly simple and lacked architectural details. Though it was really just a matter of time before a castle was created in this manner, it’s doubtful anyone expected it to come from Minnesota.

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Printing 3D Arms for Children in Sudan

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SCIENCE CAN BE MAGICAL.


This is truly awesome.

murketing:


Meet the machine of the moment: the DreamVendor, a set of four MakerBot Thing-O-Matics that sit behind glass and 3-D print your tchotchke of choice.
The DreamVendor is the brainchild of Dr. Chris Williams, Director of Virginia Tech’s DREAMS Lab, and student Amy Elliot, who led the design. “We wanted an experience where someone could walk up and use a 3-D printer without having to worry about anything besides loading a file and selecting ‘Print,’” says Williams.

 (via The Future of Stuff: Vending Machine That Prints in 3-D | Wired Design | Wired.com)

murketing:

Meet the machine of the moment: the DreamVendor, a set of four MakerBot Thing-O-Matics that sit behind glass and 3-D print your tchotchke of choice.

The DreamVendor is the brainchild of Dr. Chris Williams, Director of Virginia Tech’s DREAMS Lab, and student Amy Elliot, who led the design. “We wanted an experience where someone could walk up and use a 3-D printer without having to worry about anything besides loading a file and selecting ‘Print,’” says Williams.

 (via The Future of Stuff: Vending Machine That Prints in 3-D | Wired Design | Wired.com)

Objet High Temperature Material for 3D Printing 
When it comes to 3D Printing, Objet is continuing to set the standard when it comes to material options and flexibility. With the addition of a new High Temperature Material, this brings the choice to well over 60 different material options available for their line of 3D Printers—not to mention the transparent VeroClear, and ABS-like digital material, bio-compatiblematerial and the rigid and opaque VeroWhitePlus. With this newest addition the actual possibility of functional testing and real world applications has broken through to an incredible new level. High Temperature Material or (RGD525) combines two areas that are vital when it comes to testing prototypes thermal resistance and dimensional stability. As this new material is fully capable of simulating the thermal performance of engineering plastics it is ideal for testing of static parts. The High Temperature Material has an initial heat deflection temperature of 63-67 °C (145-153 °F) when removed from the printer but through some post processing it can be increased to 75-80 °C (167-176 °F).
Core77

Objet High Temperature Material for 3D Printing

When it comes to 3D Printing, Objet is continuing to set the standard when it comes to material options and flexibility. With the addition of a new High Temperature Material, this brings the choice to well over 60 different material options available for their line of 3D Printers—not to mention the transparent VeroClear, and ABS-like digital materialbio-compatiblematerial and the rigid and opaque VeroWhitePlus. With this newest addition the actual possibility of functional testing and real world applications has broken through to an incredible new level. 

High Temperature Material or (RGD525) combines two areas that are vital when it comes to testing prototypes thermal resistance and dimensional stability. As this new material is fully capable of simulating the thermal performance of engineering plastics it is ideal for testing of static parts. The High Temperature Material has an initial heat deflection temperature of 63-67 °C (145-153 °F) when removed from the printer but through some post processing it can be increased to 75-80 °C (167-176 °F).

Core77

Look at your computer setup and imagine that you hooked up a 3D printer. Instead of printing on bits of paper this 3D printer makes real, robust, mechanical parts. To give you an idea of how robust, think Lego bricks and you’re in the right area. You could make lots of useful stuff, but interestingly you could also make most of the parts to make another 3D printer. That would be a machine that could copy itself.