Engineering is Awesome
83-year-old inventor wins $40,000 award for his DIY filament extruder
The purpose of this competition is to drive down the cost of filament by creating a new filament extruder. Currently the cost of plastic filament is $30~50/kg, by creating such a new machine the organizers seek to make the filament price drop to around $5.
The first one who uploads a solution will be the winner -The first team/person to build an open source filament extruder for less than $250 in components can take ABS or PLA resin pellets, mix them with colorant, and extrude a 1.75mm +/- .01mm filament that can be used in a 3D printer is declared the winner.
…
The winner here is 83-year-old Hugh Lyman, an engineer, inventor, fisherman and golfer from Enumclaw, Washington. Hugh Lyman holds eight patents and has been building quite a few low-cost desktop 3D printers and printing things for family and friends, as well parts for his inventions.
Lyman entered the Lyman Filament Extruder in the contest in Aug.2012 but was disqualified because the budget exceeded the $250 limit. So he modified the design and came up with the second version: the Lyman Filament Extruder II. “It’s my first machine with a few little parts changed,” he says. “I resubmitted it, and it worked. It worked great.” The judges agreed and declared him as the winner.
…
The Lyman Filament Extruder II is a machine that extrudes filament from pellets for use in a 3D Printer. It features more metal parts than the previous version. It extrudes different filament diameters depending on the nozzle hole size. With this home-made filament extruder, you can save 80% on the material costs. A spool of plastic filament costs $50/kg, and buying a kilogram of pellets and extruding your own filament will cost you only about $10. And if you buy 25 kilograms of pellets in bulk, you only need to pay $5 for each kilogram.
Lyman’s invention is open source for anyone to use and build, and it could benefit a whole 3D printing community. His Filament Extruder has been downloaded 10608 times, and 1563 people have downloaded the version 2.
3ders.org

83-year-old inventor wins $40,000 award for his DIY filament extruder

The purpose of this competition is to drive down the cost of filament by creating a new filament extruder. Currently the cost of plastic filament is $30~50/kg, by creating such a new machine the organizers seek to make the filament price drop to around $5.

The first one who uploads a solution will be the winner -The first team/person to build an open source filament extruder for less than $250 in components can take ABS or PLA resin pellets, mix them with colorant, and extrude a 1.75mm +/- .01mm filament that can be used in a 3D printer is declared the winner.

The winner here is 83-year-old Hugh Lyman, an engineer, inventor, fisherman and golfer from Enumclaw, Washington. Hugh Lyman holds eight patents and has been building quite a few low-cost desktop 3D printers and printing things for family and friends, as well parts for his inventions.

Lyman entered the Lyman Filament Extruder in the contest in Aug.2012 but was disqualified because the budget exceeded the $250 limit. So he modified the design and came up with the second version: the Lyman Filament Extruder II. “It’s my first machine with a few little parts changed,” he says. “I resubmitted it, and it worked. It worked great.” The judges agreed and declared him as the winner.

The Lyman Filament Extruder II is a machine that extrudes filament from pellets for use in a 3D Printer. It features more metal parts than the previous version. It extrudes different filament diameters depending on the nozzle hole size. With this home-made filament extruder, you can save 80% on the material costs. A spool of plastic filament costs $50/kg, and buying a kilogram of pellets and extruding your own filament will cost you only about $10. And if you buy 25 kilograms of pellets in bulk, you only need to pay $5 for each kilogram.

Lyman’s invention is open source for anyone to use and build, and it could benefit a whole 3D printing community. His Filament Extruder has been downloaded 10608 times, and 1563 people have downloaded the version 2.

3ders.org

murketing:


Meet the machine of the moment: the DreamVendor, a set of four MakerBot Thing-O-Matics that sit behind glass and 3-D print your tchotchke of choice.
The DreamVendor is the brainchild of Dr. Chris Williams, Director of Virginia Tech’s DREAMS Lab, and student Amy Elliot, who led the design. “We wanted an experience where someone could walk up and use a 3-D printer without having to worry about anything besides loading a file and selecting ‘Print,’” says Williams.

 (via The Future of Stuff: Vending Machine That Prints in 3-D | Wired Design | Wired.com)

murketing:

Meet the machine of the moment: the DreamVendor, a set of four MakerBot Thing-O-Matics that sit behind glass and 3-D print your tchotchke of choice.

The DreamVendor is the brainchild of Dr. Chris Williams, Director of Virginia Tech’s DREAMS Lab, and student Amy Elliot, who led the design. “We wanted an experience where someone could walk up and use a 3-D printer without having to worry about anything besides loading a file and selecting ‘Print,’” says Williams.

 (via The Future of Stuff: Vending Machine That Prints in 3-D | Wired Design | Wired.com)

prostheticknowledge:

Tinkercad

Online browser-based 3D modelling services looks like a great way to introduce anyone into designing, from children to adults. Uses modern web technology (such as WebGL) and it’s presentation is clean, functional, and undaunting. Anything created can be made with a 3D printer, and has the option to be sent to services that can make your designs.

Free To Use, Pay When You Order

With Tinkercad you can design real things that come out of the 3D printer, into your life. You don’t need any previous design expertise. Just open the browser and start creating! Share your designs with friends and explore things made by other makers. 3D print things on your own printer or order things delivered to your doorstep by high quality 3D printing services.

You can check out Tinkercad here

whisperoftheshot:

Printrbot: Your First 3D Printer by Brook Drumm

I designed the Printrbot to be the simplest 3D printer yet.  There are some great kits out there - the Makerbot, the Ultimaker, the Prusa Mendel, and others - but none as small and simple as the Printrbot.  This all-in-one 3D printer kit can be assembled and printing in a couple of hours.  Other kits will not only take you many more hours to build, they will also have hundreds more parts, and they will cost more.  My design also does away with the finicky calibration and adjustment from which most 3D printers suffer.   This is the printer a kid could put together. We assemble the electronics, we assemble the hotend, and we put the connectors on all the motors and components… no soldering required!

These are said to only take 45 minutes to build compared to the hours it takes to build a reprap or makerbot.  They are also comparably cheaper, only $500 for a kit and $750 for a fully assembled machine, if they get fully kickstartered.

Kickstarter

Jeffrey Lipton of Fab@Home on 3D Printing

Jeffrey Lipton of Fab@Home demonstrates their 3D printing system at Maker Faire Bay Area 2011. This open source personal manufacturing machine can print with many different materials from plastic to cookie dough. When used in a classroom, Fab@Home furthers STEM educationby making students comfortable with the software, hardware, fabrication, and materials.

MAKE

MakerBot in the Wild: Mechanical Engineering Class 
 
MakerBot Operator Scott Miller sent us these pictures of his students doing work with a MakerBot at Mech Design class at Olin college.  They have high end 3D printers installed at their school, but he brought his MakerBot in to show how 3D printers work and run some prints.

There is no substitute for being able to put a machine on the table, upload a file, and build a part in real time. Being able to build working prototypes quickly is a critical part of the Olin College Mechanical Design class.  We use 3D printing and Sheet Metal to leverage their complementing strengths.  To design effective parts, it is critical to understand the fabrication process.  We used the Thing-O-Matic in class to visually demonstrate the entire 3D printing process from the design in Solidworks -> STL -> SkeinForge -> GCode -> 3D print.  Understanding the print methodology and internal structure of the parts allows the students to be more effective right off the bat for their 3D printed designs.


MakerBot Industries

MakerBot in the Wild: Mechanical Engineering Class

MakerBot Operator Scott Miller sent us these pictures of his students doing work with a MakerBot at Mech Design class at Olin college.  They have high end 3D printers installed at their school, but he brought his MakerBot in to show how 3D printers work and run some prints.

There is no substitute for being able to put a machine on the table, upload a file, and build a part in real time. Being able to build working prototypes quickly is a critical part of the Olin College Mechanical Design class.  We use 3D printing and Sheet Metal to leverage their complementing strengths.  To design effective parts, it is critical to understand the fabrication process.  We used the Thing-O-Matic in class to visually demonstrate the entire 3D printing process from the design in Solidworks -> STL -> SkeinForge -> GCode -> 3D print.  Understanding the print methodology and internal structure of the parts allows the students to be more effective right off the bat for their 3D printed designs.

MakerBot Industries